OERR Rubric Table

From BCcampus Mediawiki
Jump to: navigation, search


Open Education Resource Repository (OERR) Rubric

Assessment Type Level 3 Level 2 Level 1
Authority

This rubric focuses on the credentials, reputation and association the author/institution has to the subject matter covered in the OERR.

  • The OERR is affiliated to institutions of higher education. Example: Harvard University
  • The OERR content is reviewed by experienced individuals in the field. For example, an editor of biology magazine reviews OE content uploaded into the repository.
  • The OERR is affiliated to agencies providing educational services. Example: Pathways Educational Services
  • The OERR content has no visible review standards for content curated.
  • The OERR has no visible affiliations to institutions or organizations of merit.
Audience

This rubric focuses on the collection of people, based on age, experience or expertise for which the content was developed or curated.

  • The OERR content is organized and accessible by audience type. Example: The OER allows for both browsing and limiting by undergraduate.
  • The OERR content is comprised mainly of materials developed for scholars in higher education.
  • The OERR content is organized by audience but accessibility is limited. Example: The OER allows for browsing of undergraduate materials but the search cannot be limited by audience.
  • The OERR content is comprised of materials developed for all education levels.
  • The OERR content has no visible organization based on audience type.
  • The OERR content has minimal materials developed for scholars in higher education.
Access & Diversity

This rubric focuses on the availability and the provision of content for variety of learning styles and capabilities.

  • The OERR requires alternative formats for uploaded materials. Example: A video includes the written transcript.
  • The OERR contains a diversity of gender, language, cultural expression, and educational approach. Example: A Spanish instructor records a video lecture on Carlos Ruiz Zafón.
  • The OERR has some resources with alternative formats.
  • The OERR has very little content containing a diversity of gender, language, cultural expression, and educational approach.
  • The OERR has no statement of inclusion of alternative formats.
  • The OERR does not contain diversity of gender, language, cultural expression, and educational approach.
User-friendliness

This rubric focuses on the barriers to accessing and using the OER content.

  • The OERR does not require any registration for access to content.
  • The OERR is functional across all operating systems and a variety of web browsers.
  • The OERR does not require fee for use.
  • The OERR navigation is intuitive to use.
  • The OERR requires registration for access to some content.
  • The OERR contains some material that is limited to an operating system or web browser.
  • The OERR contains some material that requires payment for access to content.
  • The OERR navigation requires some trial and error to use.
  • The OERR requires registration for accessing content.
  • The OERR is limited to a specific operating system or web browser.
  • The OERR requires payment for access to content.
  • The OERR navigation is counterintuitive and/or requires additional guidance.
Subject Coverage

This rubric focuses on the depth of coverage of a subject area.

  • The OERR contains comprehensive materials within a subject area. Example: The OER contains subject materials in the area of continental philosophy and includes coverage of existentialism, idealism, and post-structuralism.
  • The OERR connects important associated concepts within the subject matter. Example: A search on continental philosophy will yield existentialism, idealism, and post-structuralism in the search results.
  • The OERR contains some comprehensive materials in some subject areas. Example: The OER contains comprehensive content for cellular biology but minimal content in the area of molecular biology.
  • The OERR connects important associated concepts within some subject matters. Example: The OERR contains important association concepts within cellular biology materials but not in molecular biology.
  • The OERR does not contain comprehensive materials within any subject.
  • The OERR does not connect important associated concepts within the subject matter.
Search Functionality & Browsing

This rubric focuses on the search functionality (e.g. advanced, basic, truncation, etc.) of the OERR to help users find exactly what they need without having to spend too much time browsing.

  • The OERR contains an advanced search function with limiters for audience, subject, media type, and licensing and permissions.
  • The OERR provides browsing functionality for audience, subject, media type, and licensing and permissions.
  • The OERR search and browsing results yield relevant results.
  • The OERR has an advanced search function and includes some or no optional limiters.
  • The OERR provides limited browsing functionality. Example: The OER allows browsing by audience, but not by media type.
  • The OERR search and browsing yield some relevant results.
  • The OERR does not have an advanced search function, but may have a basic search function.
  • The OERR does not have a categorized browsing functionality.
  • The OERR search and browsing yield irrelevant results.
Media Type

This rubric focuses on the types of media (e.g. video, audio, textual, visual, etc.) found within the OERR.

  • The OERR contains a wide variety of media types.
  • The OERR has some variety of media types.
  • The OERR contains a small variety of media types.
Licensing and Permission
  • The OERR is free to share, alter, and adapt, subject to some restrictions (e.g., CC-BY-SA or CC-BY-NC)and most resources are provided in open formats that can be easily modified.
  • The OERR is covered by a robust and easy-to-understand licence (e.g., Creative Commons or GNU).
  • The OERR is free to share, but not to alter or adapt (e.g., CC-BY-ND or CC-BY-NC-ND)and some resources are provided in open formats that can be easily modified.
  • The OERR is covered by a robust and easy-to-understand licence (e.g., Creative Commons or GNU).
  • The OERR is free to share for educational purposes only (i.e., not free to share for other non-commercial purposes).
  • The OERR is not free to alter or adapt.
  • The OERR is covered by vague or non-specific terms of use (e.g., website terms of service).